Dark and Stormy Recipe

Dark-and-Stormy-recipe

Method

Build

Glass

Hi-Ball

Category

Rum

Dark And Stormy Recipe Ingredients

50ml Goslings Black Seal Rum
1/2  Lime
2 Dashes Of Angostura Bitters
Top Ginger Beer

How To Make A Dark And Stormy Cocktail

Cut the lime into 3-4 wedges and put one wedge to the side.

Squeeze the limes into the glass and discard to release all of the juice and oils from the fruit.

Add cubed ice to a collins glass and the ginger beer to just over 2/3 of the glass.

Pour 50ml of Goslings Black Seal Rum slowly over the top of the ginger beer. Add a few dashes of Angostura Bitters and garnish with the lime zest.

Garnish

Lime Zest

Tell Us About The Dark And Stormy Cocktail

The Dark and Stormy cocktail recipe is a classic hailing from the warmer climes of the Caribbean.

The origins of the Dark and Stormy cocktails recipe date back to just after the First World War in Bermuda.

The cocktail was born out of a ginger beer factory run by the Royal Naval Officer’s Club, whose members quickly cottoned onto the fact that rum and ginger beer are a match made in heaven.

Crew of the HMS Harbour

The Dark and Stormy cocktail is actually subject to a trademark, whereby if you call it a Dark and Stormy on any cocktail menu or online recipe it must be made with the original Goslings Black Seal Rum.

The truth is most aged or dark rums will work well for making this cocktail.

Expert Tip

An overhead shot of Bermuda, the birthplace of the Dark and Stormy Recipe

When creating the Dark and Stormy cocktail recipe you will notice that the rum floats at the top of the image. This is for aesthetics and should be stirred before drinking.

To achieve this it’s actually not that hard.

Make the cocktail as directed and then when it comes to the rum, measure this out into a jigger (the standard cocktail measure) or something of a similar size like a shot glass.

Pour the rum slowly into the drink down the side of the glass if you can. The rum should layer nicely on top of the lime and ginger beer.

The layering effect comes from the difference in the liquid density due to the sugar.

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